campaign to watch: what the well?

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campaign: “What the Well” wristbands
raising the money: Jenna Bayto + friends at Georgia Southern Univ.
raised so far: about $500

When Jenna and her friends at Georgia Southern realized that colorful duct tape makes durable and eye-catching wristbands, they said, Why the well not? This year, they’ve crafted tons of bracelets to sell online and all over campus. 100% of sales go to their campaign for clean water projects. We asked Jenna a little more about her creation and where it’s going:

smile!

How did you hear about charity: water?
I found charity: water through the I-HEART Revolution on
i-heart.org. I saw where Joel Houston gave up his birthday to raise money. I decided to check out the website and realized how many people the water crisis affected and how easy it was to get involved.

Where did the wristband idea come from? And where’d you learn how to make them?
Before I started making the bracelets, I had been collecting money in jars covered in duct tape. I got bored one day and decided to make a duct tape bracelet. As I finished it, it hit me that I could sell them as a fundraiser.

Gotta hand it to you guys, this is good stuff! You always hear about world hunger and things of that nature but never about water… I’m supporting you guys whole-heartedly on this!

– Ethan, a fan on Facebook

You could’ve supported any cause. Why water?
Clean water is the one thing that no one can live without. It is completely vital to everything and I couldn’t imagine living without it.

How have you done so far?
The bracelets have caught on pretty well. Everyone loves them because 100% goes to the campaign and because we make them with a snap so you can remove yours without having to cut it off.

Where do you sell them?
My roommate and I started selling them here on campus at GSU, but now we are selling them in our hometowns and other cities across the state through friends and family members.

And the cost of materials — it can’t be much… right?
Most of the duct tape was donated from my roommate who has helped me make several of the bracelets. She has been a huge help! But as far as money spent on materials, it’s been probably no more than $50.

duct tape

Any success stories about your campaign so far? 
The first weekend after my roommate and I had started making bracelets, we went back to our hometowns. We had pre-made several bracelets for ourselves, so we could advertise. While we were home, we sold every bracelet we had made including our own and ended up having to buy more duct tape to make a lot more because they were such a hit!

What’s your advice for others who want to run a campaign?
Starting a mycharity: water campaign is a great idea! It’s a great way to raise money and to help raise awareness. I’ve found that once people hear about the water crisis, they are more than willing to help any way they can. I would definitely recommend using a creative craft to raise money. It works well!

It’s been really cool to be able to see the impact we are having and to be selling them to people we don’t even know. We hope to raise enough to sponsor one water project ($5,000). We’ll see how we do!

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Bike. Run. Sell baked goods. Make things out of duct tape. You can do anything to raise funds for clean drinking water. 100% of donations go directly to water projects in developing countries. Learn more here >

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